Are 500 Calories at Noon the Same as 500 Calories at Midnight? y

Here’s the deal: You expend energy throughout the day in a number of ways through “active” energy, like going for a run and walking the dog, and “resting” energy—which includes involuntary processes such as blood circulation and breathing.
Even while you sleep, your body is using energy to keep you alive, says Aragon.
Meanwhile, all day long, your body is either storing or burning (also known as oxidizing) fat. The big picture of weight loss comes down to something called net fat balance, which is the difference between fat storage and fat oxidation.
Say your total energy expenditure for the day is 2,000 calories. If you eat 2,000 calories, your weight will remain the same. Take in any more and you’ll gain weight, and any less and you’ll lose it.
We’ve all heard this, of course, but for some reason, we often think it doesn’t apply under certain conditions.
Related: 7 Healthy Snacks That Suppress Your Appetite
“The energy doesn’t reappear and disappear out of nowhere,” says Aragon, who contends that it doesn’t matter whether the calories you consume are distributed in three regular meals during the day or one big meal at night.
Example: Imagine you eat nothing but a cheeseburger, fries, and shake at midnight, and your buddy eats the same meal at 8 a.m.
Early in the day before you eat, your body will be in a fasting stage since you’re not consuming calories—you’re only burning them. Once you eat your huge meal later in the day, that’s when your body starts to store fat.
Your friend who eats the same meal in the morning will go through the same process, just reversed. Neither of you are more or less likely to gain weight based on what time of day your body stores and burns fat.
And it’s not as if your body closes up shop at the end of the day. Your net fat balance over days, weeks, and even months is what counts when it comes to losing weight, says Aragon.
(To shed extra weight, try our Lose Your Spare Tire! Program. It’s the easiest way to drop 10, 20, or even 50 pounds!)
The bottom line: For weight maintenance, eat when you want to, as long as you don’t overeat. And for weight loss, do the same, as long as you eat fewer calories than you expend.
This isn’t to suggest that weight control is easy. That part depends on the individual—and many factors, including your lifestyle, genetics, and environmental influences.
But believe it or not, it is this simple.


Healthy Eyes

Having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is one of the best things you can do to make sure that you’re seeing the best you can and that you’re keeping your eyes healthy.
Millions of people have problems with their vision every year. Some of these problems can cause permanent vision loss and even blindness, while others are common problems that can be easily corrected with glasses or contact lenses.
eye chart

What is a comprehensive dilated eye exam?

A comprehensive dilated eye exam is a painless procedure in which an eye care professional examines your eyes to look for common vision problems and eye diseases, many of which have no early warning signs. Regular comprehensive eye exams can help you protect your sight and make sure that you are seeing your best. Read more.

What are common vision problems?

Some of the most common vision problems are uncorrected refractive errors. These include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia. Read more.

What are age-related eye diseases and conditions?

As you age, you are at higher risk of developing age-related eye diseases and conditions. These include: age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma, low vision and dry eye. Read more.

What can I do to keep my eyes healthy?

Read these tips for keeping your eyes healthy and your vision at its best

Is organic baby food better for my baby?

Organic foods are produced without conventional pesticides, chemical fertilizers, antibiotics or growth hormones. Feeding your baby organic baby food might limit his or her exposure to these substances.
Conventional growers use pesticides to protect their crops from molds, insects and diseases. When farmers spray pesticides, this can leave residue on produce. Organic produce carries significantly fewer pesticide residues than does conventional produce.
Some people might buy organic baby food to limit their babies' exposure to these residues — since infants might be more susceptible to harm potentially caused by pesticides than are adults. However, residues on most products — both organic and nonorganic — don't exceed government safety thresholds.
Generally, research hasn't shown organic foods to be more nutritious than nonorganic foods. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) provides organic seals for products that contain various percentages of organic ingredients — but the USDA makes no claims or guarantees that organic foods are safer or more nutritious than are nonorganic foods.
Some parents prefer organic baby food because it's environmentally friendly. Others feel that organic baby food simply tastes better. What's most important, however, is a balanced diet. Offering your child healthy foods from the beginning — whether they're organic or not — will set the stage for a lifetime of healthy eating.

Afghan conflict: MSF 'disgust' at government hospital claims

Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) has said it is "disgusted" by Afghan government statements justifying an air strike on its hospital in Kunduz, calling it an "admission of a war crime".
MSF said the statement implies US and Afghan forces decided to bomb a hospital because of claims Taliban members were inside.
The charity blames US-led Nato forces for Saturday's attack which killed at least 22 people, including MSF staff.
The US is investigating the incident.
Afghan government forces, backed by the US-led coalition, have been engaged in a battle to retake the northern city of Kunduz from Taliban fighters who seized it last month.

'Raze to the ground'

On Saturday the Afghan defence ministry said "armed terrorists" were using the hospital "as a position to target Afghan forces and civilians".
MSF said in a statement: "These statements imply that Afghan and US forces working together decided to raze to the ground a fully functioning hospital - with more than 180 staff and patients inside - because they claim that members of the Taliban were present.
Image copyright Reuters
Image caption MSF says its workers reported no fighting inside the hospital before the attack
"This amounts to an admission of a war crime. This utterly contradicts the initial attempts of the US government to minimise the attack as 'collateral damage.'"
US Defence Secretary Ashton Carter said on Sunday that a full, transparent investigation would be conducted into whether the US military could be linked to the attack.
MSF re-iterated its demand for an independent investigation by an international body.
Media caption Footage from the scene showed the still smoking remains of the clinic
Twelve MSF staff members and 10 patients were killed when the hospital was hit.
Dozens were injured and the hospital severely damaged by a series of air strikes lasting more than an hour from 02:00 local time on Saturday morning.
On its Twitter feed, MSF said: "The hospital was repeatedly and precisely hit during each aerial raid, while the rest of the compound was left mostly untouched.
"Not a single member of our staff reported any fighting inside the hospital compound prior to the US air strike on Saturday morning."

Read more on the battle for Kunduz:

Image copyright European Photopress Agency
Image caption Food is distributed to residents who have been forced to stay home without food or electricity to escape street battles

Afghan troops are now reported to have recaptured most of Kunduz after it was seized by the Taliban.
MSF said it was pulling most of its staff out of the area but some medical staff were treating the wounded at other clinics.
"All critical patients have been referred to other health facilities and no MSF staff are working in our hospital," a spokeswoman for the charity told AFP news agency.
MSF says the hospital was a lifeline for thousands in the city and in northern Afghanistan.
US President Barack Obama has expressed his condolences and said he would await the conclusions of an inquiry before making a definitive judgement.
The UN called the strikes "inexcusable and possibly even criminal", with Secretary General Ban Ki-moon calling for a thorough and impartial investigation.

This Woman's Husband Secretly Stalked Her—for 9 Years

When you marry someone, you expect that they’ll do everything to love and protect you. But one woman recently discovered that her husband was doing anything but.
An unidentified mother of three from Linden, Utah, has been receiving e-mails threatening her with assault and rape since 2006—and a police investigation revealed that they were coming from her husband.
According to The Associated Press, the woman (whose name has been withheld because she’s a victim of sexual assault) turned to her husband for protection when she started receiving the e-mails—sometimes as many as 40 in one day.
RELATED: This Woman Was Viciously Harrassed Online for 5 Years
He later admitted that he'd set up multiple fake e-mail accounts to cover his tracks.
Why the heck would anyone do that? Apparently, he was pissed that she reportedly had an affair at one point in their relationship.
The couple is now separated, and the woman has a protective order against her estranged husband. He faces 10 counts of stalking and is due back in court in August.
Unfortunately, online harassment happens. According to recent data collected by the Pew Research Center, nearly 75 percent of American adults say they’ve been harassed online at some point.
RELATED: What Makes Some People Harrass Others Online
Of course, there are varying degrees of online harassment. The majority of people who have been harassed say they’ve experienced “less severe” forms of harassment, like being called offensive names or embarrassed.
But 18 percent of all Internet users say they’ve been the victim of “more severe” forms of online harassment: Eight percent have been physically threatened, eight percent have been stalked, seven percent have been harassed for a sustained period of time, and six percent have been sexually harassed.
There are laws in the U.S. to protect victims of online harassment, but distinguishing between online abuse and free speech is so difficult that many women don’t realize they have options.
And they do: In 2013, Congress added cyber stalking to the Violence Against Women Act. Charlotte Laws, a member of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, helped California ban revenge porn that same year after anonymous hackers posted topless photos of her daughter online.
In December, the Supreme Court heard arguments in U.S. v. Elonis, a case in which Anthony Elonis was arrested after he posted on Facebook that he would murder his ex (his attorneys say he’s protected under free speech laws). A decision in the case could decide the legal future of online harassment.
RELATED: Here’s How You Put a Stop to Revenge Porn for Good
If you are the victim of more severe forms of online harassment—stalking, threats, and sexual harassment—contact your local authorities. Just because harassment happens online doesn’t mean you have to put up with it.

How to Heal Your Bruises a Whole Lot Faster

Warmer weather is finally (finally!) here, and you know what that means—it’s time to show off your gams in cute skirts and sundresses. Granted, you may feel less inclined to reach for your favorite pair of Daisy Dukes if you experience bruising on the regular. Find out what’s to blame for your dark spots—and follow these doctor-approved tricks to speed up the healing process.
Capillaries are tiny blood vessels that transport nutrients between blood and surrounding tissues—and any change to them can lead to a bruise. "You have little capillaries that are only cushioned by tissue [collagen] and skin," says Rachel Nazarian, M.D., a dermatologist at Schweiger Dermatology in New York City. "Anything that causes that skin to thin, the collagen to decrease, or the actual walls of the capillaries to be weaker [and break], is going to increase your likelihood of bruising."
RELATED: 7 Reasons You Bruise Easily
Some areas—like the shins—have less cushion, making them more prone to bruising. Another culprit? Vitamin deficiency. The two main vitamins you need to prevent them are vitamin C and K, says Nazarian. "If you're vitamin deficient, you actually have a clotting abnormality," she says.
And unfortunately, some people are just more susceptible to bruising than others. "When the skin is more transparent [a.k.a. you're pale], the blood underneath is going to be more obvious," says Nazarian. So while you may not actually be bruising more, the marks are more apparent.
How to Speed up the Healing Process

If your bruise is changing color, that’s a good sign. What starts as a deep red-purple will eventually turn into a yellow-green, and then a golden brown before the bruise disappears. But we know that can feel like it takes forever. Luckily, there are a few steps you can take to speed things along. Dermend Moisturizing Bruise Formula Cream ($30, is one topical treatment you can use daily if you're prone to bruising. You can also use it when you have a bruise since it’s infused with arneca, a flower that increases blood circulation and treats inflammation, says Nazarian.
If you’re vitamin-deficient, ingesting vitamins C and K, either through your diet or via supplements, will help prevent constant bruising, while topical application will help to heal a bruise faster. Try applying VI Derm Vitamin C Topical Serum ($80, or Reviva Labs Vitamin K Cream ($19, to areas you often get them so that you can start treating them before they even appear.
RELATED: I Tried an IV Drip for Younger-Looking Skin—Here’s What Happened
Oddly enough, eating a lot of pineapple may also do some good, too. The fruit contains an enzyme called bromelain, which helps reduce swelling, says Nazarian.
Nazarian also recommends icing the bruise within 24 hours to reduce inflammation and possible pain, in addition to applying an elastic bandage. "Using a bandage can help slow the blood flow to better control the bleeding,” she says. “It can minimize the size of the bruise."
The Best Camouflage Options
While you’re waiting for that thing to completely fade, you can use cover-up to conceal bruises. "My go-to [brand] is Cover FX,” says Nazarian. “[Their products] tend to have more of an opaque covering with a lot of different skin tones and provide great coverage when basic makeup won’t cover it." Simply dab the product over the bruise, and blend with your fingertips.
RELATED: The Reason Why You Look So Tired—Even When You’re Not
And since bruising is less noticeable on darker skin tones, swap in a tinted body lotion for your daily moisturizer. Jergens Natural Glow Daily Moisturizer ($6.79, and NKD SKN Gradual Glow Daily Tan Moisturizer ($15, provide all day hydration and safe color

Healthy Eating

Easy Tips for Planning a Healthy Diet and Sticking to it

Improving Emotional Health Healthy eating is not about strict dietary limitations, staying unrealistically thin, or depriving yourself of the foods you love. Rather, it’s about feeling great, having more energy, improving your outlook, and stabilizing your mood. If you feel overwhelmed by all the conflicting nutrition and diet advice out there, you’re not alone. It seems that for every expert who tells you a certain food is good for you, you’ll find another saying exactly the opposite. But by using these simple tips, you can cut through the confusion and learn how to create a tasty, varied, and healthy diet that is as good for your mind as it is for your body.

How does healthy eating affect mental and emotional health?

We all know that eating right can help you maintain a healthy weight and avoid certain health problems, but your diet can also have a profound effect on your mood and sense of wellbeing. Studies have linked eating a typical Western diet—filled with red and processed meats, packaged meals, takeout food, and sugary snacks—with higher rates of depression, stress, bipolar disorder, and anxiety. Eating an unhealthy diet may even play a role in the development of mental health disorders such as ADHD, Alzheimer’s disease, and schizophrenia, or in the increased risk of suicide in young people.
Eating more fruits and vegetables, cooking meals at home, and reducing your fat and sugar intake, on the other hand, may help to improve mood and lower your risk for mental health problems. If you have already been diagnosed with a mental health problem, eating well can even help to manage your symptoms and regain control of your life.
While some specific foods or nutrients have been shown to have a beneficial effect on mood, it’s your overall dietary pattern that is most important. That means switching to a healthy diet doesn’t have to be an all or nothing proposition. You don’t have to be perfect and you don’t have to completely eliminate foods you enjoy to have a healthy diet and make a difference to the way you think and feel.

Healthy eating tip 1: Set yourself up for success

To set yourself up for success, think about planning a healthy diet as a number of small, manageable steps—like adding a salad to your diet once a day—rather than one big drastic change. As your small changes become habit, you can continue to add more healthy choices.
  • Prepare more of your own meals. Cooking more meals at home can help you take charge of what you’re eating and better monitor exactly what goes into your food.
  • Make the right changes. When cutting back on unhealthy foods in your diet, it’s important to replace them with healthy alternatives. Replacing animal fats with vegetables fats (such as switching butter for olive oil) will make a positive difference to your health. Switching animal fats for refined carbohydrates, though (such as switching your breakfast bacon for a donut), won’t lower your risk for heart disease or improve your mood.
  • Simplify. Instead of being overly concerned with counting calories, think of your diet in terms of color, variety, and freshness. Focus on avoiding packaged and processed foods and opting for more fresh ingredients.
  • Read the labels. It’s important to be aware of what’s in your food as manufacturers often hide large amounts of sugar and salt in packaged food, even food claiming to be healthy.
  • Focus on how you feel after eating. This will help foster healthy new habits and tastes. The more healthy food you eat, the better you’ll feel after a meal. The more junk food you eat, the more likely you are to feel uncomfortable, nauseous, or drained of energy.
  • Drink plenty of water. Water helps flush our systems of waste products and toxins, yet many people go through life dehydrated—causing tiredness, low energy, and headaches. It’s common to mistake thirst for hunger, so staying well hydrated will also help you make healthier food choices.

Healthy eating tip 2: Moderation is key

Harvard Healthy Eating Plate Key to any healthy diet is moderation. But what is moderation? In essence, it means eating only as much food as your body needs. You should feel satisfied at the end of a meal, but not stuffed. Moderation is also about balance. Despite what fad diets would have you believe, we all need a balance of carbohydrates, protein, fat, fiber, vitamins, and minerals to sustain a healthy body.
For most of us, moderation also means eating less than we do now. But it doesn't mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza. If you eat 100 calories of chocolate one afternoon, balance it out by deducting 100 calories from your evening meal. If you're still hungry, fill up with extra vegetables.
  • Try not to think of certain foods as “off-limits.” When you ban certain foods or food groups, it is natural to want those foods more, and then feel like a failure if you give in to temptation. Start by reducing portion sizes of unhealthy foods and not eating them as often. As you reduce your intake of unhealthy foods, you may find yourself craving them less or thinking of them as only occasional indulgences.
  • Think smaller portions. Serving sizes have ballooned recently. When dining out, choose a starter instead of an entree, split a dish with a friend, and don't order supersized anything. At home, visual cues can help with portion sizes–your serving of meat, fish, or chicken should be the size of a deck of cards and half a cup of mashed potato, rice, or pasta is about the size of a traditional light bulb. If you don't feel satisfied at the end of a meal, add more leafy green vegetables or round off the meal with fruit.
  • Take your time. Stop eating before you feel full. It actually takes a few minutes for your brain to tell your body that it has had enough food, so eat slowly.
  • Eat with others whenever possible. As well as the emotional benefits, this allows you to model healthy eating habits for your kids. Eating in front of the TV or computer often leads to mindless overeating.

It's not just what you eat, but when you eat

  • Eat breakfast, and eat smaller meals throughout the day. A healthy breakfast can jumpstart your metabolism, while eating small, healthy meals (rather than the standard three large meals) keeps your energy up.
  • Avoid eating at night. Try to eat dinner earlier and fast for 14-16 hours until breakfast the next morning. Studies suggest that eating only when you’re most active and giving your digestive system a long break each day may help to regulate weight.

Healthy eating tip 3: Fill up on colorful fruits and vegetables

Fruits and vegetables are low in calories and nutrient dense, which means they are packed with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber. Focus on eating the recommended daily minimum of five servings of fruit and vegetables and it will naturally fill you up and help you cut back on unhealthy foods. A serving is half a cup of raw fruit or veg or a small apple or banana, for example. Most of us need to double the amount we currently eat.
Try to eat a rainbow of fruits and vegetables every day as deeply colored fruits and vegetables contain higher concentrations of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Add berries to breakfast cereals, eat fruit for dessert, and snack on vegetables such as carrots, snow peas, or cherry tomatoes instead of processed snack foods.
  • Greens. Branch out beyond lettuce. Kale, mustard greens, broccoli, and Chinese cabbage are all packed with calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, zinc, and vitamins A, C, E, and K.
  • Sweet vegetables. Naturally sweet vegetables—such as corn, carrots, beets, sweet potatoes, yams, onions, and squash—add healthy sweetness to your meals and reduce your cravings for added sugars.
  • Fruit. Fruit is a tasty, satisfying way to fill up on fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants. Berries are cancer-fighting, apples provide fiber, oranges and mangos offer vitamin C, and so on.

Healthy eating tip 4: Eat more healthy carbs and whole grains

Choose healthy carbohydrates and fiber sources, especially whole grains, for long-lasting energy. Whole grains are rich in phytochemicals and antioxidants, which help to protect against coronary heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes.

What are healthy carbs and unhealthy carbs?

Healthy carbs (or good carbs) include whole grains, beans, fruits, and vegetables. Healthy carbs are digested slowly, helping you feel full longer and keeping blood sugar and insulin levels stable.
Unhealthy carbs (or bad carbs) are foods such as white flour, refined sugar, and white rice that have been stripped of all bran, fiber, and nutrients. They digest quickly and cause spikes in blood sugar levels and energy.

Tips for eating more healthy carbs

Whole Grain Stamp
  • Include a variety of whole grains in your healthy diet, including whole wheat, brown rice, millet, quinoa, and barley.
  • Make sure you're really getting whole grains. Check for the Whole Grain Stamps that distinguish between partial whole grain and 100% whole grain.
  • Try mixing grains as a first step to switching to whole grains. If whole grains like brown rice and whole wheat pasta don’t sound good at first, start by mixing what you normally use with the whole grains. You can gradually increase the whole grain to 100%.
Avoid: Refined foods such as breads, pastas, and breakfast cereals that are not whole grain.

Healthy eating tip 5: Enjoy healthy fats and avoid unhealthy fats

Good sources of healthy fat are needed to nourish your brain, heart, and cells, as well as your hair, skin, and nails. Foods rich in certain omega-3 fats can reduce cardiovascular disease, improve your mood, and help prevent dementia.

Add to your healthy diet:

  • Monounsaturated fats, from plant oils like canola oil, peanut oil, and olive oil, as well as avocados, nuts (like almonds, hazelnuts, and pecans), and seeds (such as pumpkin, sesame).
  • Polyunsaturated fats, including Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, found in fatty fish such as salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, and some cold water fish oil supplements. Other sources of polyunsaturated fats are unheated sunflower, corn, soybean, flaxseed oils, and walnuts.

Reduce from your diet:

  • Saturated fats, found primarily in animal sources including red meat and whole milk dairy products.
  • Trans fats, found in vegetable shortenings, some margarines, crackers, candies, cookies, snack foods, fried foods, baked goods, and other processed foods made with partially hydrogenated vegetable oils.
For more, see Choosing Healthy Fats.

Healthy eating tip 6: Reduce sugar and salt

As well as creating weight problems, too much sugar causes energy spikes and has been linked to diabetes, depression, and even an increase in suicidal behaviors in young people. Reducing the amount of candy and desserts you eat is only part of the solution as sugar is also hidden in foods such as bread, cereals, canned soups and vegetables, pasta sauce, margarine, instant mashed potatoes, frozen dinners, low-fat meals, fast food, and ketchup. It all adds up to a lot of empty calories since your body gets all it needs from sugar naturally occurring in food.
Sodium is another ingredient that is frequently added to food to improve taste, even though your body needs less than one gram of sodium a day (about half a teaspoon of table salt). Eating too much salt can cause high blood pressure and lead to an increased risk of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, memory loss, and erectile dysfunction. It may also worsen symptoms of bipolar disorder. 

How sugar is hidden in food labels

Do some detective work

Spotting added sugar on food labels can require some sleuthing. Manufacturers are required to provide the total amount of sugar in a serving but do not have to spell out how much of this sugar has been added and how much is naturally in the food. Added sugars must be included on the ingredients list, which is presented in descending order by weight. The trick is deciphering which ingredients are added sugars. They come in a variety of guises. Aside from the obvious ones—sugar, honey, molasses—added sugar can appear as agave nectar, cane crystals, corn sweetener, crystalline fructose, dextrose, evaporated cane juice, fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, and more.
A wise approach is to avoid products that have any of these added sugars at or near the top of the list of ingredients—or ones that have several different types of sugar scattered throughout the list. If a product is chock-full of sugar, you would expect to see “sugar” listed first, or maybe second. But food makers can fudge the list by adding sweeteners that aren’t technically called sugar. The trick is that each sweetener is listed separately. The contribution of each added sugar may be small enough that it shows up fourth, fifth, or even further down the list. But add them up and you can get a surprising dose of added sugar.
Let’s take as an example a popular oat-based cereal with almonds whose package boasts that it is “great tasting,” “heart healthy” and “whole grain guaranteed.” Here’s the list of ingredients:
Whole-grain oats, whole-grain wheat, brown sugar, almond pieces, sugar, crisp oats,* corn syrup, barley malt extract, potassium citrate, toasted oats,* salt, malt syrup, wheat bits,* honey, and cinnamon.
*contain sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, and/or brown sugar molasses.
Combine brown sugar, sugar, corn syrup, barley malt extract, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, brown sugar molasses, and malt syrup, and they add up to a hefty dose of empty calories—more than one-quarter (27%) of this cereal is added sugar, which you might not guess from scanning the ingredient list. This type of calculation can be especially tricky in breakfast cereals, where most of the sugars are added.
Adapted with permission from Reducing Sugar and Salt, a special health report published by Harvard Health Publications.

Tips for cutting down on sugar and salt

  • Slowly reduce the sugar and salt in your diet a little at a time to give your taste buds time to adjust and wean yourself off the craving.
  • Avoid processed or packaged foods like canned soups, frozen dinners, or low-fat meals that often contain hidden sugar and sodium that quickly surpasses the recommended limit. Prepare more meals at home and use fresh or frozen vegetables instead of canned vegetables.
  • Be careful when eating out. Most restaurant and fast food meals are loaded with sodium. Some offer lower-sodium choices or you can ask for your meal to be made without salt. Most gravy, dressings and sauces are also packed with salt and sugar, so ask for it to be served on the side.
  • Eat healthier snacks. Buy unsalted nuts and add a little of your own salt until your taste buds are accustomed to eating them salt-free. Cut down on sweet snacks such as candy, chocolate, and cakes. Instead, eat naturally sweet food such as fruit, peppers, or natural peanut butter to satisfy your sweet tooth.
  • Check labels and choose reduced-sodium and low-sugar products.
  • Use herbs and spices such as garlic, curry powder, cayenne or black pepper to improve the flavor of meals instead of salt.
  • Avoid sugary drinks. Try drinking sparkling water with a splash of fruit juice instead.

Healthy eating tip 7: Add calcium for bone health

Your body uses calcium to build healthy bones and teeth, keep them strong as you age, send messages through the nervous system, and regulate the heart’s rhythm. If you don’t get enough calcium in your diet, your body will take calcium from your bones to ensure normal cell function, which can lead to osteoporosis.
Recommended calcium levels are 1000 mg per day, 1200 mg if you are over 50 years old. Try to get as much from food as possible and use only low-dose calcium supplements to make up any shortfall. Limit foods that deplete your body’s calcium stores (caffeine, alcohol, sugary drinks), do weight-bearing exercise, and get a daily dose of magnesium and vitamins D and K—nutrients that help calcium do its job.

Good sources of calcium include:

  • Dairy: Dairy products are rich in calcium in a form that is easily digested and absorbed by the body. Sources include low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese.
  • Vegetables and greens: Many vegetables, especially leafy green ones, are rich sources of calcium. Try collard greens, kale, romaine lettuce, celery, broccoli, fennel, cabbage, summer squash, green beans, Brussels sprouts, asparagus, and crimini mushrooms.
  • Beans: such as black beans, pinto beans, kidney beans, white beans, black-eyed peas, or baked beans.
For more, see Calcium and Bone Health.

Healthy eating tip 8: Put protein in perspective

Protein gives us the energy to get up and go—and keep going. While too much protein can be harmful to people with kidney disease, the latest research suggests that most of us need more high-quality protein from sources other than red meat and dairy, especially as we age.

How much protein do you need?

Protein needs are based on weight rather than calorie intake.  Adults should eat at least 0.8g of lean, high-quality protein per kilogram (2.2lb) of body weight per day.
  • Older adults should aim for 1 to 1.5 grams of lean protein for each kilogram of weight. This translates to 68 to 102g of protein per day for a person weighing 150 lbs.
  • Divide your protein intake equally among meals.
  • Nursing women need about 20 grams more high-quality protein a day than they did before pregnancy to support milk production.
Source: Environmental Nutrition

How to add high-quality protein to your diet

  • Replace red meat with fish, chicken, or plant-based protein such as beans, nuts, and soy.
  • Replace  processed carbohydrates from pastries, cakes, pizza, cookies and chips with fish, beans, nuts, seeds, peas, tofu, chicken, low-fat dairy, and soy products.
  • Snack on nuts and seeds instead of chips, replace baked dessert with Greek yogurt, or swap out slices of pizza for a grilled chicken breast and a side of beans.
For more, see Good Ways to Get Quality Protein.

Healthy eating tip 9: Bulk up on fiber

Eating foods high in dietary fiber can help you stay regular, lower your risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, and help you lose weight. Depending on your age and gender, nutrition experts recommend you eat at least 21 to 38 grams of fiber per day for optimal health. Many of us aren't eating half that amount.
  • In general, the more natural and unprocessed the food, the higher it is in fiber.
  • Good sources of fiber include whole grains, wheat cereals, barley, oatmeal, beans, nuts, vegetables such as carrots, celery, and tomatoes, and fruits such as apples, berries, citrus fruits, and pears.
  • There is no fiber in meat, dairy, or sugar. Refined or “white” foods, such as white bread, white rice, and pastries, have had all or most of their fiber removed.
  • An easy way to add more fiber to your diet is to start your day with a whole grain cereal or add unprocessed wheat bran to your favorite cereal.

How fiber can help you lose weight

Since fiber stays in the stomach longer than other foods, the feeling of fullness will stay with you much longer, helping you eat less. Fiber also moves fat through your digestive system quicker so less of it is absorbed. And when you fill up on fiber, you'll also have more energy for exercising.
To learn more, read High-Fiber Foods.

Healthy eating tip 10: Learn your recommended daily amounts

Recommended Daily Amounts
Fruits and vegetables
At least five ½ cup servings
1,000mg or 1,200mg if over 50
21g to 38g
0.8g to 1.5g of high-quality protein per kilogram (2.2lb) of body weight
Saturated fat
No more than 16g
Trans fat
No more than 2g
Keep calories from added sugars under 100 (24g or 6 teaspoons) for women and under 150 (36g or 9 teaspoons) for men
No more than 1,500 to 2,300 mg (one teaspoon of salt)

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